Taxpayers foot £27 million personal injury solicitor bill

After it was revealed that taxpayers have recently foot the bill for £27 million worth of personal injury compensation, the UK’s personal injury solicitors were firmly blamed for the heightened costs.

The largest public sector union in the UK revealed that its injury solicitors won almost 4,000 cases over the past 12 months.  Unison stated that these figures not only car crashes and assaults but also incorporated payouts for slips and back injuries at work.

A high percentage of these claims were made by public center staffing.  Many hundreds of these staff worked for NHS trusts and councils.

Over the past two years, totals have reached the £50 million mark easily.  Over the 2009 year payouts reached approximately £28 million.

However the cost to taxpayers has been predicted to be significantly higher.  This is due to the massive legal fees that public sector employers incur upon fighting against a claim.  The 1.3 million member strong Unison stated that a large percentage of workplace injuries could actually be prevented.

However taxpayer groups have issued warnings concerned with so-called ‘frivolous’ cases.  As many employers decide to make settlement offers in an out-of-court manner, some frivolous cases may slip through, the groups warn.

One such example of the several thousand claims that were won in 2010 include a Sheffield children’s nursery officer.  The nursery officer had suffered injuries when a falling metal door landed on her.

Also one Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust dental technician received a £7,000 award for injuries to his neck.  He claimed that he had been required to sit in a posture for long period of time, which had led to his injuries.

Additionally one council worker was awarded £2,000 for shoulder and back problems allegedly caused by strapping on ill-fitting stab vests.  The stab vests were used upon visits to housing estates that were in high crime areas.

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